Utilizing an Afrocentric Framework in Mental Health Care: Afrocentric counselling and training

Black Mental Health Canada

Utilizing an Afrocentric Framework in Mental Health Care: Afrocentric counselling and training

This project proposes to expand the delivery of an existing BMHC online curriculum to build capacity among clinicians to provide culturally safe and appropriate mental health counselling and support to Black clients who have experienced racial trauma or race-based traumatic stress. The primary audience that the project is intended to reach is mental health clinicians across Canada; both Black providers treating Black individuals as well as non-Black providers working in areas with high proportions of Black clientele. 

We aim to equip and provide an Afrocentric lens through which practitioners and can see and evaluate their Black or Black-identifying clients, and also provide and Afrocentric framework for treatment.

The project will involve implementing 100 2-day workshops over 17 months resulting in approximately 1000 – 1500 mental health practitioners across Canada trained in culturally responsive Afrocentric care for the Black community

Lead organization: Black Mental Health Canada

Building capacity among clinicians to provide mental health counselling and support to the Black community

WHO

Primary Audience:

  • Mental health clinicians across Canada – both Black providers treating Black individuals as well as non-Black providers working in areas with high proportions of Black clientele.

Secondary Audience:

  • Organizations, agencies, and businesses serving the Black community

WHAT

Objectives

To equip clinicians with the knowledge and skills on how to effectively provide support to Black clients, especially for those who have experienced Racial Trauma and/or Race Based Traumatic Stress

HOW

  1. Deliver a comprehensive Black mental health curriculum utilizing an Afrocentric framework for practitioners.
  2. Create and deliver training to other organizations beyond the field of mental health practitioners in key sectors that interact with the Black community.

WHERE

Settings

  • Online
  • Community

Implementation sites

  • National

WHY

  • Social exclusion, marginalization, and stigma often make the pathways to care more complex among people of African descent which was exacerbated by COVID-19.
  • BMHC aims to improve access to culturally safe and affirm mental health care through education.

 

In the words of the project team members

“We felt training clinicians and building their capacity was sort of the first step in at least encouraging the Black community to access mental health services, because before we can start even getting individuals and Black communities to seek services, we want to make sure that that we have capacity as clinicians to be able to speak to their needs and speak to their concerns.”

Key protective factors

  • Supportive relationships in the community
  • Education
  • Valuing diversity (e.g., gender, race, culture)
  • Equity

Key approaches

  • Culturally safe/responsive
  • Afrocentric care

 

 

Public Health Agency of Canada news release